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Comet Tempel 1

Comet Hunter's First Images on the Ground
February 15, 2011 - PASADENA, Calif. -- Mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., have begun receiving the first of 72 anticipated images of comet Tempel 1 taken by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. The first six, most distant approach images are available at http://www.nasa.gov/stardust and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov.
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Stardust-NExT spacecraft

NASA's Stardust Spacecraft Completes Comet Flyby
February 14, 2011 - PASADENA, Calif. -- Mission controllers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., watched as data downlinked from the Stardust spacecraft indicated it completed its closest approach with comet Tempel 1. An hour after closest approach, the spacecraft turned to point its large, high-gain antenna at Earth. It is expected that images of the comet's nucleus collected during the flyby will be received on Earth starting at about midnight California time (3 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Feb. 15).
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Composite image was taken by NASA's Stardust spacecraft 42 hours before its encounter with comet Tempel 1

The Two Faces of Tempel 1
February 14, 2011 - PASADENA, Calif. -- Just one year before its Feb. 14 encounter with comet Tempel 1, NASA's Stardust spacecraft performed the largest rocket burn of its extended life. With the spacecraft on the opposite side of the solar system and beyond the orbit of Mars, the comet hunter's rockets fired for 22 minutes and 53 seconds, changing the spacecraft's speed by 24 meters per second (54 mph).
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Composite image was taken by NASA's Stardust spacecraft 42 hours before its encounter with comet Tempel 1

NASA Spacecraft Hours From Comet Encounter
February 14, 2011 - PASADENA, Calif. -- As of today, Feb. 14, at 9:21 a.m. PST (12:21 p.m. EST), NASA's Stardust-NExT mission spacecraft is within a quarter-million miles (402,336 kilometers) of its quarry, comet Tempel 1, which it will fly by tonight. The spacecraft is cutting the distance with the comet at a rate of about 10.9 kilometers per second (6.77 miles per second or 24,000 mph).
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Comet Tempel 1

Heading Into the Bonus Round –In Space
February 9, 2011 - PASADENA, Calif. -- A bonus round is something one usually associates with the likes of a TV game show, not a pioneering deep space mission. "We are definitely in the bonus round," said Stardust-NExT Project Manager Tim Larson of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "This spacecraft has already flown by an asteroid and a comet, returned comet dust samples to Earth, and now has almost doubled its originally planned mission life. Now it is poised to perform one more comet flyby."
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