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The Deep Impact Crater on 9P/Tempel 1 from Stardust-NExT

By P.H. Schultz, B. Hermalyn, & J. Veverka

  A ray emerging to one side (a) corresponds to the missing mound in Stardust-NExT images (c) while a narrow gap in the ejecta curtain downrange (b) corresponds with the edge of a cliff in the pre- (c) and post-impact images (c, inset).
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A ray emerging to one side (a) corresponds to the missing mound in Stardust-NExT images (c) while a narrow gap in the ejecta curtain downrange (b) corresponds with the edge of a cliff in the pre- (c) and post-impact images (c, inset). The longer ray to one side (a) is consistent with the crater growing and consuming the small mound to the left of (and slightly up from) the impact point (IP) in “c.” This small mound is missing in the inset from Stardust-NExT. Disruption of the downrange ejecta curtain (DR in “b”) may be related to interruption of crater growth downrange as it reached a knob on the facing cliff (“c”).

 

 

  Examples of nested craters on the impact melt downrange of King crater on the Moon.
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Examples of nested craters on the impact melt downrange of King crater on the Moon. Nested craters form by impacts into a layered target. The inner pit results from penetration through a thin regolith into a competent substrate and reflects strength scaling. The outer rim forms by excavation of the overlying regolith, dominated more by gravity scaling.

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