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Comet Day at Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind

by Nicole Hess, McREL

  CSDB principal Lou Tutt and Allan Cheuvront   Allan Cheuvront answering student questions
  CSDB Principal Lou Tutt and Allan Cheuvront, Lockheed Martin Space Systems.   Allan answers questions from students.

September 14, 2010 – Colorado Springs, Colorado - Students at the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind (CSDB) participated in a fun-packed Comet Day where they learned about comets, NASA's upcoming Discovery Program missions: Stardust-NExT and EPOXI, along with the reasons why scientists are interested in studying comets. The goal of Comet Day was to prepare students to better understand the nature of the solar system and upcoming NASA mission events through speakers, hands-on activities, stories, models, and special treats. Comet Day featured a talk by a NASA spacecraft engineer, a plethora of hands-on activities, and four tactile planetariums—giving students an opportunity to explore the night sky.

  Ben Wentworth helps a student learn how solar wind interacts with comet   Ben Wentworth helps two students understand how the solar wind interact with a comet   Ben Wentworth helps students understand how the solar wind interact with a comet  
  Ben Wentworth helps students understand how the solar wind interact with a comet, forming a tail.  

Guest speaker Allan Cheuvront, Stardust-NExT Spacecraft Team Chief at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, shared his experience with the past, present, and future of NASA's Stardust-NExT mission, prompting an assortment of questions from the curious students including, "Where do spacecrafts get power in space?"

  A student interacting with a comet model   A student interacting with a comet model   Tactile graphic of ejecta and plume on comet Tempel 1  
  Dee McLellan, JPL solar system educator, helps students visualize the Deep Impact.   Tactile graphic of ejecta and plume on comet Tempel 1 during Deep Impact encounter in July, 2005.  

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